Illustration of a person breaking their chains, surrounded by the rainbow-colored infinity symbol, representing inclusion and the autistic community. Mad Pride is written over the symbol, representing their overlap. Illustration by Abigail Schad | The Michigan Daily
Illustration of a person breaking their chains, surrounded by the rainbow-colored infinity symbol, representing inclusion and the autistic community. Mad Pride is written over the symbol, representing their overlap. Illustration by Abigail Schad | The Michigan Daily

Our brains are not broken: Mad Pride, neurodiversity and how diversity becomes disease

Treatment needs to be about healing, not keeping society comfortable. It needs to center autonomy. It needs to be about individuals defining their own experience.


Recently, after accidentally falling down a rather deep Google rabbit hole, I learned a new term: Mad Pride, which, in simple terms, is a movement trying to encourage society to view neurodivergence and other mental illnesses in a more positive light. “Mad” is a reclaimed term, meaning that, although it has been used in a derogatory manner in the past, people once targeted by the term now use it to self-describe themselves. Mad Pride as a movement began in the 1970s in response to coercive treatments in mental healthcare, which all too often attempted to subdue a patient and emphasized productivity and adherence to social norms, sometimes at the expense of actually improving their quality of life. Read more…


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